Dinny Nolan Tjampitjinpa

Dinny Nolan Tjampitjinpa (born c. 1935) is a highly respected member of his tribe, and is officially recognized as a rainmaker and a leader of rainmaking ceremonies. He also ‘polices’ other coroboree sites in the area as well as painting the bodies of persons taking part in ceremonies.  Dinny is a nomad but can usually be found close to the Papunya area.

Dinny Nolan, when interviewed, said that he is a survivor of the Coniston massacre. (This was the last officially condoned massacre of Aboriginal people. About 70 Warlpiri men and women were murdered on Coniston Station in August 1928).

Dinny Nolan worked as a stockman before following in the footsteps of several of his relatives and settling in Papunya to paint for Papunya Tula Artists in the mid-1970s.  He travelled to Melbourne in 1977 for an exhibition of Papunya Tula paintings and in 1981 he visited Sydney to construct the first ground painting to be seen outside of Central Australia.

His paintings are included in the Australian National Gallery collection and one of Dinny Nolan’s designs was used for a stained glass window in the National Gallery of Victoria.

 

Willi Willi

Screenprint

70 x 51 cm

Edition length: 80

$550.00 inc. GST

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Water Dreaming

Screenprint

114 x 75.5 cm

Edition length: 80

$880.00 inc. GST

PURCHASE